FY09 STUDY TORS

Approved for Public Release


USAF Scientific Advisory Board
FY 2009 Summer Study

Alternative Sources of Energy for U.S. Air Force Bases

Terms of Reference
 
Background
U.S. Air Force installations, both CONUS and OCONUS are reliant on energy that is supplied via the local power grid. If the energy supply to these installations were disrupted, diminished, or denied, the operational and national security consequences could be considerable. Self-sustaining, alternative energy sources for AF installations could mitigate risks of power loss due to vulnerabilities in the local and national power grids and their aging infrastructure.

Charter
This study will:
  • Evaluate and assess current and projected Air Force installation energy needs, including consumption, conservation, and potential vulnerabilities to grid and other upsets. Consider both domestic and overseas bases, including expeditionary bases.
  • Identify alternative energy sources for installations including energy generation and storage systems.
  • Assess the potential benefits and challenges associated with identified alternatives. Explore the environmental, political, economic, and societal considerations in this assessment, as well as the ability for the base to operate independently of local power grids.
  • Recommend potential energy technologies and systems that could be used for improved energy reliability, conservation, utilization, and independence for Air Force installations in the near-, mid-, and far-term.
Study Products
Briefing to SAF/OS & AF/CC in July 2009. Publish report in December 2009.

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USAF Scientific Advisory Board
FY 2009

Rapid On-Orbit Checkout of Space Systems
Terms of Reference
Background
Long on-orbit checkout periods for newly launched satellites increases the operational cost of space systems and delays the delivery of critical capabilities to the warfighter. In some cases, on-orbit checkout of U.S. Air Force satellites has taken longer than a year. Since satellites are typically built for about 10 years of life, an extended on-orbit checkout period can consume a significant portion of the usable lifetime. In contrast, on-orbit checkout for commercial space systems and for some foreign satellite systems takes considerably less time.

This study will consider the factors that contribute to long on-orbit check-out times, and recommend technology and process solutions to enable rapid on-orbit check-out of space systems. What features in the design of Air Force satellites, systems engineering specifications, and management practices can be changed to reduce the time and cost of initial checkout operations?

Charter
The study will:
  • Examine and catalogue the initial operational times of current space systems on orbit, including military, commercial, and other nations' systems.
  • Compare the requirements and design features of systems to determine the causes for specific checkout requirements, accounting for different satellite functions and capabilities.
  • Identify strategies, design practices, manufacturing criteria, testing requirements, and changes to ground stations and systems that could significantly reduce the time it takes to check out the satellites on orbit.
  • Propose improvements in simulation, modeling, testing techniques, and operator training that could ultimately reduce on-orbit calibration and checkout requirements.
  • Recommend practical approaches for the near- and mid-term to reduce the on-orbit checkout times of Air Force space systems while assuring their reliability, early availability, and responsiveness.
Study Products
Briefing to SAF/OS & AF/CC in July 2009. Publish report in December 2009.

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USAF Scientific Advisory Board
FY 2009

Virtual Training Technologies
Terms of Reference
Background
Training to maintain operational readiness of aircraft systems is a growing concern due to cost and availability of assets. Air Force aircraft are aging and increasingly in demand, making it difficult to conduct live training on some systems. The rising cost of fuel equates to higher training costs since readiness has traditionally been maintained by flying training sorties on operational aircraft. As new weapon systems come online, the integration of new capabilities into the system of systems multiplies training requirements across the force.

Are there virtual training technologies in development that may help the Air Force train more efficiently or effectively? What virtual training techniques are being used extensively in industry that could be leveraged to enhance operational readiness in the future? How are other military services using virtual training and can their successes help guide Air Force use of these technologies?

Charter
The study will:
  • Assess the state-of-the-art in modeling, simulation and virtual training methods. Evaluate to what extent such methods are being used within industry and other military services.
  • Identify areas in the Air Force where such training technologies could make a significant impact. Assess current capabilities and gaps with the Air Force's Distributed Mission Operations.
  • Identify integration challenges when coupling virtual with live training. Include the feasibility of integrating simulated environments with embedded training using aircraft operational flight plan (OFP) software. Recommend technology solutions required to realize a mixed (virtual/live) training capability.
  • Assess methods to rapidly create and validate virtual training scenarios to include realistic threat presentations, especially those scenarios where live training is difficult.
  • Define technology options for improving aircraft system virtual training in the near-, mid-, and far-term.
Study Products
Briefing to SAF/OS & AF/CC in July 2009. Publish report in December 2009.

Approved for Public Release